Well. Here we are.

The chameleon was a one-time thing. Probably. My name is Alaina Johns. I'm a freelance writer and editor based in Philadelphia, PA.  

 

 

The (very) first Pennsylvanians

The (very) first Pennsylvanians

Published on August 14, 2018 with Keystone Edge.

After arriving from Ireland in 1795, the Miller family farmed their land in southwestern Pennsylvania for generations. But no one knew they’d settled on ground that would rock the modern scientific world — until Albert Millertook a walk in 1955 and noticed a fresh groundhog hole.

Miller (born 1911) was a successful farmer, but he was also a pilot, photographer, amateur historian and archivist, archeology enthusiast, and lifelong conservationist. Back in the 1950s, he couldn’t have known that a burrowing rodent had broken ground on what is today the Meadowcroft Rockshelter and Historic Village. But even as a youngster roaming the property (about an hour’s drive southwest of Pittsburgh in Avella, PA), Miller believed he walked in the footsteps of people who had been there a long time. Read more.

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